In Kisumu, Kenya, pit latrines are the dominant form of sanitation, yet the servicing of these pits has previously been unregulated.

This Note outlines the recent introduction of Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) – led by Kisumu County Public Health Office – which aim to minimise operator and public health risk throughout the emptying and disposal process.

 

PULA app Practice Note front cover

Service providers involved in faecal sludge management (FSM) are held back by a lack of current data on their customer base, operating standards and levels of service.

This Practice Note introduces PULA, an innovative mobile app now being developed to bridge the data gap.

In WSUP’s experience, one key barrier to citywide FSM service provision is lack of data. This means a lack of up-to-date information about the areas of the city being serviced by FSM businesses; about the target customer base for these businesses, and the extent to which businesses are reaching low-income households; and about operating standards (the extent to which businesses are providing a safely managed service). Without this data, authorities are left in the dark about the state of sanitation service provision in their city, undermining their ability to plan, implement and evaluate FSM interventions.

A mobile app has the potential to respond effectively to these challenges, by facilitating real-time, accurate data collection. This in turn will give municipal authorities a clear picture of sanitation in their city; and support the professionalisation of vacuum tanker businesses, by giving drivers the means to collect detailed information about their customer base and jobs completed.
PULA: the design process.

WSUP and project partners BoP and UX are in the process of developing the app through an iterative human-centred design process, with the aim of ensuring app design and functionality respond to genuine user requirements. Initial, intensive ‘Design Sprints’ have been conducted in Ghana and Kenya to develop early prototypes and gather feedback through interviews and workshops with target users, including vacuum tanker business owners and water and sewerage utilities.

The aim is to develop an app which can be customised to the local context, enabling vacuum tanker owners, drivers and municipal sanitation authorities to choose from a menu of features.

WSUP works on the front line of a challenging sector: not everything goes to plan when trying to innovate. This note details the development and testing of a business model in Chittagong (Bangladesh) that was found to be unviable. It is part of a series of reports emerging from a business-focused on-site sanitation programme funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

WSUP works on the front line of a challenging sector: not everything goes to plan when trying to innovate. This note details the development and testing of two sanitation business models in Kisumu (Kenya) that were found to be unviable. It is part of a series of reports emerging from a business-focused on-site sanitation programme funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

WSUP works with water utilities around the world to reduce their rates of Non-Revenue Water (NRW). This Practice Note describes a successful NRW programme undertaken by WSUP and JIRAMA, Madagascar’s state electricity and water utility in the capital city, Antananarivo.

Urban utilities are often unwilling to extend or improve services to unserved areas for fear that not enough water is available. This Practice Note introduces an Excel-based modelling tool that projects the water demand implications of slum water improvements in a given city.

Public toilets are the leading form of sanitation in urban Ghana: in Kumasi, 700,000 people use one each day. This Note presents the activities of Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly (KMA) to raise the standard of these services.

In the low-income communities of Kumasi and Ga West (Accra), over half the population live in compounds without access to an in-house toilet. This Note details WSUP’s support to Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly (KMA) and Ga West Municipality in developing a five-year Compound Sanitation Strategy.

This Practice Note is one of a three-part series reporting the findings of recent action research to encourage greater municipal investment in sanitation in three African cities. The advocacy process in Maputo (Mozambique) involved engaging the media with ongoing efforts to promote implementation of a sanitation tariff raised via water bills.

This Practice Note is one of a three-part series reporting the findings of recent action research to encourage greater municipal investment in sanitation in three African cities. The advocacy process in Ga West Municipality (Greater Accra, Ghana) focused on supporting the municipality to improve property tax collection, in return for a commitment to allocate a proportion of the extra revenues to pro-poor sanitation.