WSUP works on the front line of a challenging sector: not everything goes to plan when trying to innovate. This note details the development and testing of a business model in Chittagong (Bangladesh) that was found to be unviable. It is part of a series of reports emerging from a business-focused on-site sanitation programme funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

WSUP works on the front line of a challenging sector: not everything goes to plan when trying to innovate. This note details the development and testing of two sanitation business models in Kisumu (Kenya) that were found to be unviable. It is part of a series of reports emerging from a business-focused on-site sanitation programme funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

WSUP works with water utilities around the world to reduce their rates of Non-Revenue Water (NRW). This Practice Note describes a successful NRW programme undertaken by WSUP and JIRAMA, Madagascar’s state electricity and water utility in the capital city, Antananarivo.

Urban utilities are often unwilling to extend or improve services to unserved areas for fear that not enough water is available. This Practice Note introduces an Excel-based modelling tool that projects the water demand implications of slum water improvements in a given city.

Public toilets are the leading form of sanitation in urban Ghana: in Kumasi, 700,000 people use one each day. This Note presents the activities of Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly (KMA) to raise the standard of these services.

In the low-income communities of Kumasi and Ga West (Accra), over half the population live in compounds without access to an in-house toilet. This Note details WSUP’s support to Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly (KMA) and Ga West Municipality in developing a five-year Compound Sanitation Strategy.

This Practice Note is one of a three-part series reporting the findings of recent action research to encourage greater municipal investment in sanitation in three African cities. The advocacy process in Maputo (Mozambique) involved engaging the media with ongoing efforts to promote implementation of a sanitation tariff raised via water bills.

This Practice Note is one of a three-part series reporting the findings of recent action research to encourage greater municipal investment in sanitation in three African cities. The advocacy process in Ga West Municipality (Greater Accra, Ghana) focused on supporting the municipality to improve property tax collection, in return for a commitment to allocate a proportion of the extra revenues to pro-poor sanitation.

Improved sanitation is not just about building shiny new toilets – it is critical to maintain existing infrastructure. This Practice Note details a research project in Dhaka looking at behaviour change strategies to help users keep their toilets clean and functional.

You can also download the full report.

Improving urban sanitation requires big investment by municipal as well as national government: but in most African cities, sanitation receives less than 1% of the total municipal budget. This Practice Note reports ongoing research around how to encourage greater municipal investment in sanitation, in cities in Kenya, Ghana and Mozambique.