Climate recovery in Beira: sustainable water and sanitation access for a more resilient city

In the aftermath of Cyclone Idai, WSUP has been delivering sustainable, long-term water and sanitation solutions to help mitigate the effects of climate change for thousands of residents in Beira. In March 2019 Cyclone Idai caused devastation across Mozambique, including in the city of Beira which suffered from widespread flooding and severe damage to its […]


Peri-urban community Livingstone

Climate resilience in Southern Zambia – new report

Water & Sanitation for the Urban Poor has today published a new report on the need for water and sanitation service providers in Southern Zambia to become more resilient in the face of climate change. The report, entitled, Building resilience to climate change: experiences from Southern Zambia, focuses on water shortage in the Zambezi river […]


Building resilience to climate change experiences from Southern Zambia

As the effects of man-made climate change become more pronounced, water shortages are becoming more common throughout Africa, with Southern Africa identified as a particular climate change hotspot.

This report examines the challenges faced by Southern Water & Sanitation Company Limited (SWSC) in Southern Zambia, as climate change has reduced its available water supply in recent years.

The report outlines steps being taken by SWSC under a utility strengthening programme created by WSUP with support from Wasser fuer Wasser.

WSUP at World Water Week graphic

Join us for World Water Week 2020

This year World Water Week will be held virtually, with WSUP co-convening five sessions through the week of 24 August 2020. With Covid-19 and climate change both demonstrating the need to invest in improved water, sanitation, and hygiene for the poorest people around the world, meeting to discuss these issues is more important than ever. […]


Rasoa, resident in Antananarivo

Bright water, bright future: climate resilient services in Madagascar

For residents of Antananarivo like Rasoa, access to reliable water sources is essential in the face of increasing water scarcity. Across the globe climate change is affecting the most vulnerable people in cities the most. For Madagascar’s peri-urban communities alternating severe droughts and flooding are making it harder for people to access safe, clean water […]


Henriqueta and her children access water

From the front line of climate change: residents tell their stories

What does climate change mean for the most vulnerable people living in urban areas? Ahead of this year’s World Water Day, WSUP has been finding out how climate change affects the water and sanitation needs of city residents. The following stories give a snapshot of the challenges faced around the world, from rising temperatures in […]


WSUP support enables Madagascar utility to access EUR 71.5m in funding

A 10-year programme of support from WSUP has helped the national water utility in Madagascar, JIRAMA, to secure a EUR 71.5 million investment package from the European Investment Bank, European Union, and Government of Madagascar. The package consists of a loan of EUR 35 million and a grant of EUR 30 million from the EIB […]


Community in Beira, Mozambique

Six months after two deadly cyclones, Mozambique needs more than just rebuilding

Mozambique will need all the help it can get first to deliver basic services like housing and sanitation, and then to ensure they are built to last. This article was first published on Thomson Reuters Foundation News. By Carla Costa, Country Programme Manager for WSUP in Mozambique The official government plan to rebuild Mozambique after two […]


Running Dry front cover

WSUP has identified five myths which are stopping investors, agencies and policymakers from properly addressing the inadequate access to essential water and sanitation services in cities across Africa and South Asia.

 

Myth one: Struggling utilities are unable to serve the poorest

The reality: Much-maligned, publicly owned utilities can deliver services for the poorest communities.

Myth two: Water should be free

The reality: Water is a human right, but people should still pay for it. Even the poorest.

Myth three: Communities should be responsible for their own services

The reality: Community ownership can result in poor services. We should be aiming for community buy-in instead.

Myth four: We should only focus on household facilities

The reality: Community sanitation facilities can help bridge the gap when household facilities are not viable.

Myth five: Building toilets alone will solve the sanitation crisis

The reality: Solving the waste management conundrum is bigger than just building toilets.